Tagged: insect-eating plants

Two Pitcher Plant Comparisons – Nepenthes hamata vs. Nepenthes ventricosa x hamata

Pitcher Plant Comparisons

Two Pitcher Plant Comparisons – Nepenthes hamata vs. Nepenthes ventricosa x hamata

Here we are showing two pitcher plant comparisons. Both plants are insect eaters also known as carnivorous plants and require insects or other small organisms in order to grow.  Hamata comes from the Latin word hamatus meaning “hooked”. It describes the appearance of the highly developed teeth of this species. The similarities between the two plants is uncanny. This is in a large part due to the hybrid having Nepenthes hamata as one of the parents in the cross. The strong appearance of “teeth” in the peristome (“mouth”) of either N. hamata or N. ventricosa x hamata is coveted by horticulturalists. 

Holiday Sale Coming Up

 

Next weekend December 16th through the 18th we will be running a 15% off store wide sale! New items will be available and also FREE shipping on orders of $120 or more! Use the code holiday15%off when checking out starting Friday the 16th at 5pm EDT and running until Sunday the 18th at 10pm EDT.

Happy Holidays from our family to yours!

nenepenthes

Two separate Nepenthes platychila pitchers hanging out in the greenhouse.

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Insect-Eating Pitcher Plant

An insect eating (carnivorous) pitcher plant, Nepenthes ampullaria x (spathulata x gymnamphora) is growing on our windowsill in upstate New York with no special treatment now for about a month. Temperatures during the day are about 70 F and nights in the low 60’s. The relative humidity fluctuates but is typically around 50%. We make sure the media doesn’t dry out and it gets bright light from an east facing window, and the occasional misting.

Make sure to use distilled water or rain water! Happy Holidays and happy growing everyone!